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Blog the Change for Animals: Rolling Dog Ranch

Today we are participating in Blog the Change for Animals, a day that happens four times a year and is meant to bring together pet bloggers to write about an animal related cause near and dear to them to help bring awareness to the great organization and people working to make the world a better place for animals.

My Tail Hurts From Wagging So Much decided to write about Rolling Dog Ranch in New Hampshire because once we found out about them, we were in love.

They are an animal sanctuary that rescues and shelters disabled animals.Their website says, “every animal who arrives at the sanctuary gets another chance to have a safe and loving home.”


Steve Smith and Alayne Marker left their corporate jobs in December of 2000 and started the sanctuary in Montana with the intent to create a place focused on caring for animals with disabilities.

“These are the animals who are the least likely to be adopted and among the most likely to be euthanized in traditional shelters,” they point out on their website.

About 50 animals live at the ranch, and nearly two-thirds of them are blind.

Seriously amazing, right?

You can virtually meet some of the animals on their website and in the summer they allow visitors to stop by the sanctuary. (Yes, since they are on the East Coast not too far from me, I’ve already mentioned to the them how I cannot wait to visit)

They, too, have a blog where you can  read what their up to, and also have a Facebook page. Check them out!

12 thoughts on “Blog the Change for Animals: Rolling Dog Ranch

  1. What a wonderful cause. Thank you for telling us about it. We saw your blog on the hop, and thought we would stop by and say "hi!" We hope you'll stop over and visit us sometime too! Happy Saturday!

  2. I LOVE Rolling Dog Ranch. I have a deaf dog and am so grateful to places like Rolling Dog that realize just how wonderful these dogs are! Thanks for the post!

  3. Dogs who lose their hearing later in life, may become aggressive but it is only because of their confusion. Unlike humans, they do not understand what is happening to them and can lash out in fear when startled. Never come up behind a deaf dog who is sleeping. Even when he is awake, if he can't see you come up behind him, he may be momentarily startled and and act aggressively.

    It is also extremely important to learn how to communicate with, and train, your dog using hand signals. Whether you use American Sign Language, standard obedience signs, or signals of your own development, it is very important that you and other people who interact with your dog, are consistent with the signs that you use. Additionally, it is wise to use signs that require only one hand and can be easily detected by your dog from a distance away.

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